The Forgotten Language of the West: Rediscovering Old Norse, Spoken by Icelanders and Vikings

“When a language dies,” said writer, philosopher, and critic George Steiner, “A way of understanding the world dies with it, a way of looking at the world.” Undoubtedly he is correct. Numerous studies have demonstrated the relationship between language and perception of time, language and memory, and even claimed that the language we speak shapes consciousness itself. At…

The Forgotten Language of the West: Rediscovering Old Norse, Spoken by Icelanders and Vikings — Old Norse.org

13 thoughts on “The Forgotten Language of the West: Rediscovering Old Norse, Spoken by Icelanders and Vikings

  1. ᛋᛠᛉ

    Very nice. I use Duolingo sometimes and pretend it’s not pozzed. I’m learning Danish. Slowly. I’ve tried some Swedish and Norwegian and find myself hoping they develop an Icelandic module. Hell, I could teach myself bloody Klingon if I wanted too. The Latin unit is okay.

    I love language. Tried learning Greek once, so I could understand the Golden Dawn song… didn’t make it past the alphabet.

    Danish is by far easier to pick up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Unfuck U

      I found learning Greek isn’t extremely difficult. What I never really learned were the small letters – not the capital letters (they’re easy) – and Greek handwriting. Impossible.
      A woman from Sweden once told me that a Swede could understand what is being said in every Scandinavian language (not Finnish though, it is related to the Hungarian language).
      She said the Danish language is being a bit frowned upon as it has a very strong accent. Like a Hillibilly talking English.
      I think Danish is hard to learn because of the difference between writing and speaking. You never know how to pronounce ANYTHING. Plus, it sounds like almost throwing up XD

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Johno

        Doktor U, you’d probably have difficulty understanding spoken ‘Strayan. Many of the ‘slower’ nationalities do, those without English as their first language, such as certain of your North American* readers. *my apology in advance to any Canadians out there.

        Like

      2. Viking Life Blog

        “I think Danish is hard to learn because of the difference between writing and speaking.”

        Yes, Danish is weird like that.
        Studies has shown, that Danish is the least understandable of the North Germanic languages. I blame the Germans and the Dutch! 🙂

        Norway has both Norsk Bokmål and Nynorsk, I don’t remember if both has been cleaned up. It’s more “correct” in spelling than Danish, but they have two ways.
        I believe, that Swedish in Stockholm is different from Malmø Swedish. Danish might be more similar in general.

        Like

  2. Johno

    Doktor U, a querie for you: you’re Austrian, your country you come from is Austria. I’m Australian, I live in Australia. So, ho come Canadians don’t live in Canadia? It’s rare, true, but I’m giving the Yanks a pass this time.

    Like

    1. Unfuck U

      It was Austrians who first discovered and traveled that country. They got bored pretty fast and stated: „Kaana da!“ (Austrian slang for „nobody here“).
      Maybe some Canadian Aborigine (a bear or so) overheard their conversation and used that as a denomination of themselves.
      Being Canadian they had to fuck it up and that’s why.

      Like

      1. John

        Even the Belgians, who began colonialism rather late, took the Congo after Leopold checked with his cousins in European royalty that it wouldn’t put their noses out of joint. Did Austria have no overseas interests? I suppose it would be a bit hard without a navy!

        Like

    1. Dude Bubba

      How about the most famous Austrian admiral of all time? Don John of Austria, a Habsburg of the Spanish line. Admiral of the fleet of the Holy Roman Empire who absolutely crushed the Muslims at the Battle of Lepanto in 1571 and saved Christian Europe. Killing Muslims is nothing to disparage, you know!

      Like

      1. Unfuck U

        I bow my head in shame, Sir.
        Lepanto!
        How could I have forgotten about that glorious battle?
        Thanks for the reminder!
        We usually don’t look farther back than the reign of Franz Joseph I…

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s