Video: Austrian Jagdkommando (Special Forces)

My unit consisted of tanks. It was the first version of the MK 105 „Kürassier“, an offspring of the French AMX 13, where I was the gunner.
The following video is a bit lengthy and might be boring for non-enthusiasts to tanks. Take note that the tanks you see on this video are already the final version A2 of the Kürassier which had a targeting computer, a new muzzle brake allowing the firing of SABOT rounds, additional storage for equipment and a targeting spotlight mounted just above the main gun thus lowering the tank‘s silhouette even more. Technical data of that version suggests that it was a bit slower than the old version: 65 kilometers per hour. The one I was on ran 90 kilometers/hour on a highway. Quite impressive. It sported a 105 millimeter cannon and a coaxial machine gun cal. 308, had two revolving magazines in the aft section of the turret and had a mechanical spring operated loading system. After a shot was fired the empty casing flew backwards through a small hatch at the rear of the turret. The crew consisted of three men: commander, gunner and driver.

The Kürassier was retired in 2006.

13 thoughts on “Video: Austrian Jagdkommando (Special Forces)

  1. Johno

    Unfuck, the coaxial MG “had two revolving magazines mounted in the aft section of the turret”. Did you mean a saddle-drum magazine, and how long was the barrel, for the gun to be mounted to the rear? That extended barrel length should have resulted in greater effective 7.62mm range, or were the projectiles merely passing through a tube after leaving the barrel, to reach the what effectively was the muzzle? Was this a Froggie MG designed especially for internal use in armoured vehicles? The Aussie Leopard tanks retained the standard 7.62mm MG3 weapons, but the earlier Centurions had the .30 calibre Brownings for coaxial and flex-mount. The current MBT is the Abrams.

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    1. Unfuck U

      Nah, some misunderstanding here.
      It wasn’t the MG (Austrian designation MG 74, the Germans named it MG3, a pretty bad offspring of the awesome WWII era German MG 42) that had two rotary magazines but the main 10.5 centimeter cannon.
      This machine gun was belt fed directly out of an ammo box that was mounted right beside it on the inside of the turret.
      It was a regular MG 74 and its muzzle pointed right through a hole beside the main gun.

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    2. Unfuck U

      Talking of Centurions: we’ve had those, too but only their turrets which where mounted on hidden strategically placed bunkers.
      Most of these bunkers are gone now, too. Defense doctrine changed.

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  2. Johno

    Unfuck, I note that your correspondent Deathray was involved in tank recovery. Apparently, his role was running around the disabled tank, decapitating snakes with a machete, not sure what military speciality that is? Oh, I don’t mean the snakes had a machete, ‘cos the no hands thing. They must have been Chinese agent Commie snakes, especially trained to attack western Imperialist armoured vehicles, those sneaky Chicoms!

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    1. Unfuck U

      The commies were sneaky all right!
      First time we went out on a training mission close to the Czechoslovakian border which still featured the Iron Curtain, we were greeted over battalion radio by a Czech officer (I assume), adressing our battalion by name and wishing us a pleasant stay so close tobthe border.
      He made sure that we know that he knows we’re here…
      Deathray wasn’t decapitating snakes but collecting empty beer cans after we punched holes in them with our trusty old 9mm P38’s.
      No, wait. That was the tank driver’s role.

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  3. Johno

    Hey Unfuck, you and any of your readers into Cold War era armoured warfare, should read Jungle Tracks, by Gary McKay MC. Somewhat surprisingly, the decision to send the RAAC and their Centurion tanks to the jungles and paddy fields that made up the bulk of the ground fighting in the Viet Nam War was hugely successful. The author was a young infantry platoon commander there, winning a Military Cross. His memoir, In Good Company, is a seminal work of infantry warfare and is required reading at the Aust. Defence Forces Academy. I thoroughly recommend all his books. BTW, your blog needs a search box. I again made it back into the library, but they only allow 30 minutes on a computer, takes me that long just to find individual posts here.

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    1. Unfuck U

      Thanks for your recommendations!
      Let me please ask you to read one of the best military autobiographies ever written IMHO: “The Lost Soldier” by Guy Sayer.
      I have read it a couple of times.
      A brother of mine once gave it to me and I am still thankful he did!
      Sorry to hear about your difficulties finding older posts.
      I bet there’s gotta be a search function provided by WordPress.
      Dunno where it would be located on the page since I almost exclusively use my iPhone

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  4. Johno

    Thanks Unfuck. Yes, read The Forgotten Soldier about 30 years ago, bloody good book. I’ve never read anything about fighting on the Eastern Front that didn’t impress me. An older memoir that is a good story is The Devil’s Brigade, written by a German who evaded the Reds, made it back and joined the Frog’s Foreign Legion to fight the Viet Minh in Indochine. My oldtimer’s won’t let me remember the author’s name.

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  5. response to Johno

    Johno, blogs don’t need search boxes. Just open a new tab or window, go to the search engine of your choice, type your search however you wish, and then make the final term of your search “site:unfucku.home.blog”.
    Like this: tank video site:unfucku.home.blog
    That’s all the search box on a blog really does anyway is specify the site. Hope that helps.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Johno

    Cool, Unfuck. I’d never have thought of that. When I was at the library, I got a librarian to show me how to copy your photo of young Barry Soetoro and Michael Lavaughn Robinson, enlarged it a bit and ran out colour sheets. I don’t care that they are pooves*, none of my business. I just want it handy to show normies how manipulated the whole media circus is. *If the plural of a horse’s hoof is hooves, than more than one poof is…?

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  7. Johno

    Well the fault is my oldtimer’s! The book I was thinking of is The Devil’s Guard, by George Robert Elford. I read it 47 years ago, recommended. Unfuck, may I suggest an open thread where you and your readers may list good military reading matter, even if it is fiction. You could include movies too.

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